Discussion:
uses for pure mercury?
(too old to reply)
williamhenry
2004-11-10 00:17:20 UTC
Permalink
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces


what are the possibilities?

already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,

I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Ed Huntress
2004-11-10 01:20:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the muzzle
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.

So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in for a
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>

Ed Huntress
jim rozen
2004-11-10 13:08:10 UTC
Permalink
In article <G1ekd.55018$***@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net>, Ed Huntress
says...
Post by Ed Huntress
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in for a
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>
In case you were serious about doing this, Ed, I would strongly
advise against it. The chances for a spill are obviously small,
sure, but if it did spill the school could be in a world of
trouble. I mean, it wouldn't be like you were actually *shooting*
at the school with a 20mm cannon, but the results would be far
more troublesome to you, personally....

:^)

Jim
--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
Sportster4Eva
2004-11-10 18:04:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Huntress
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the muzzle
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in for a
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>
Ed Huntress
Totally cool project!
I have some old Popular Mechanics books (the red ones) and one of the
projects in there (I think) was a mercury pool motor. I always wanted to
build one but I never knew how to obtain the quantity of mercury
necessary....
--
Paul
'91 XL1200
'89 White Pig
"I feel more like I do now than when I got here"
HoloBarre©®
2004-11-10 18:25:08 UTC
Permalink
Whatsa mercury pool motor? How does it work?
----------------------------
Mr. P.V.'d
formerly Droll Troll
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the muzzle
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in for a
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>
Ed Huntress
Tim Williams
2004-11-10 19:50:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by HoloBarre©®
Whatsa mercury pool motor? How does it work?
(Stop me if I'm wrong here...)
One of the original experiments Faraday performed: you place a magnet in a
pool of mercury and dangle a rod in the pool. The mercury keeps electrical
contact with the rod as it rotates around the magnet from the field thus
produced. Also works backwards, with the rod fixed and the magnet swinging
around in the mercury.

Tim

--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Shawn
2004-11-17 07:12:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the muzzle
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in for a
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>
Ed Huntress
Food for thought.

http://www.newsenterpriseonline.com/articles/2004/11/12/news/news1.txt

Shawn
Ed Huntress
2004-11-17 07:04:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid
ounces
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that
was
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
just in popsci
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the
muzzle
Post by williamhenry
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in
for
Post by williamhenry
a
Post by williamhenry
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets me
arrested or something. <g>
Ed Huntress
Food for thought.
http://www.newsenterpriseonline.com/articles/2004/11/12/news/news1.txt
Shawn
Well, so much for that idea...

Ed Huntress
jim rozen
2004-11-17 13:36:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Huntress
Post by Shawn
http://www.newsenterpriseonline.com/articles/2004/11/12/news/news1.txt
Well, so much for that idea...
<ahem>.

Jim
--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
Dean
2004-11-17 21:39:20 UTC
Permalink
"
Post by williamhenry
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
Post by williamhenry
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that
was
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
Post by williamhenry
just in popsci
I have eight ounces, which I bought for cleaning the lead out of the
muzzle
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
brake on my Hi-Standard pistol. That took about one ounce.
So I made a mercury-pool model electric motor. I'm going to take it in
for
a
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
demo in my son's Physics class. We'll see if that pool of mercury gets
me
Post by Shawn
Post by Ed Huntress
arrested or something. <g>
Ed Huntress
Food for thought.
http://www.newsenterpriseonline.com/articles/2004/11/12/news/news1.txt
Shawn
Well, so much for that idea...
Ed Huntress
It's interesting the guys doing the testing are not concerned enough
to wear breathing aparatus.

-Dean Horstman
Charles A. Sherwood
2004-11-17 21:49:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean
It's interesting the guys doing the testing are not concerned enough
to wear breathing aparatus.
Can anyone supply some data, test cases, MSDS, etc, that indicate
this is really something to worry about? I still think this is way
overblown.

cs
Shawn
2004-11-18 07:32:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean
"
It's interesting the guys doing the testing are not concerned enough
to wear breathing aparatus.
-Dean Horstman
This is purely a guess but I suppose that the airborne levels were below
safe levels for everywhere else except a school. Not sure about mercury but
asbestos has different rules when a school is involved.

Shawn
Tim Williams
2004-11-18 20:15:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shawn
This is purely a guess but I suppose that the airborne levels were below
safe levels for everywhere else except a school. Not sure about mercury but
asbestos has different rules when a school is involved.
And silicone is a proven and tested, safe material (oil, liquid, gel,
rubber, whichever) for everything ... except breast implants.

Politics anyone? (Insert gagging smiley)

Tim

--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-10 01:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
They used to make rheostats (variable resistors) from carbon rods set up
so their lower ends could be raised and lowered into pots of mercury.

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Tony
2004-11-10 02:17:39 UTC
Permalink
I don't think their is any practical application for mercury. It just ends
up in a landfill, and leaches into our water & food supply. When will the
govenment wise up and tightly control this stuff?
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Billy Hiebert
2004-11-10 17:10:43 UTC
Permalink
Here are a couple of interesting mercury uses:

The Mercast process, where mercury is used in the investment process in
place of wax in the lost wax process. The mercury is poured while
liquid and then frozen. The investment mold is then made at the frozen
mercury temperature, the mercury poured out at room temperature, and the
investment mold is then used in the same manner as a wax investment mold
for casting metal.

Large parabolic mirrors, where mercury is spun to get the proper shape,
it's reflective shape then used as a telescope mirror. I think Nasa
built a 3 meter mirror in this manner, but I don't know much about the
results.
--

Billy Hiebert
HIEBERT SCULPTURE WORKS
Small Part Injection Molding
http://www.hieberts.com
Post by williamhenry
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
--
williamhenry
2004-11-11 01:11:51 UTC
Permalink
, this was headed to a landfill before I got my hands on it , and it would
be disposed of as hazardous waste when and if I am through with it , , as to
use for it there are quite a few , especially in the home , which is where
the machines I got this out of usually reside
Doug Warner
2004-11-11 06:57:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony
I don't think their is any practical application for mercury. It just ends
up in a landfill, and leaches into our water & food supply. When will the
govenment wise up and tightly control this stuff?
It's still used for refining gold, at least in some third world
countries. I recall a documentary about some big pit gold mine where
people dug up gold by hand in small sqare plots, After separating as
much sand and gravel from the gold dust as possible, they added
mercury, which sticks to the gold, forming a pasty ball. They put it
in a cloth bag and squeeze out as much mercury as possible.
Then, with everyone standing around, breathing, burn off the mercury,
leaving molten gold.

To reply, please remove one letter from each side of "@"
Spammers are VERMIN. Please kill them all.
Mark
2004-11-10 03:16:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
It's easier to tell you what you should NOT do with the mercury rather than
what to do with it. It can be absorbed into the body through the skin or
inhaled through vapors. There won't be much vapor at room temperature but
there will be some. Make sure there is always ventilation. Don't handle it
bare-handed, especially with jewelry on. The gold will form an amalgamation
with the mercury. A shiny piece of gold jewelry will become dull. It will
take a lot of polishing to remove the amalgamation. I know this from
experience. Always wear gloves and personal protective equipment.

I used to have some too, only about an ounce or two but I got rid of it 20
years ago or more and I'm glad I don't have it. It was facinating to fell
the density of such a small quantity and to see it "flow" since it's
cohesive properties are so strong compared to it's weak adhesive properties.
It was also interesting to observe how the meniscus in a container was
upside down compared to water (i.e. with water the water bends up in a
container on the edges, with mercury the edges are lower than the surface).
It was also interesting to see how the drops form into balls almost
immediately. Always wear gloves and personal protective equipment.

You might be able to make a sort of barometer with the mercury using glass
tubing. Always wear gloves and personal protective equipment.

Any mercury you pick up in your body is cumulative. Your body won't expel
it in a short time period. You can get acute poisoning or chronic
poisoning. If you choose to handle mercury, due to the way the human body
is made, a lot of the mercury will end in your brain cells. Ingest enough
and it will cause mental dysfunction. You will have mood swings, may become
irritable, depressed or frightened. You may also experience hallucinations,
memory loss or problems with concentration. Another part of your body which
will be affected is your intestines. Basically the mercury and acidic food
you eat will create tiny holes in your intestines. Bacteria and fungi will
pass through these holes and multiply inside your body. Eventually the
intestinal lining will not work very well due to the contamination.
Diarrhea, bloating, gas and constipation will result. Sometimes mercury
poisoning from overexposure will cause pneomonia, which can be fatal. You
may also experience problems with your teeth and gums. Always wear gloves
and personal protective equipment.

We have to send a letter every year to certain customers stating that no
mercury is present in the castings we sell or in any part of processing of
castings. We don't have any mercury where I work except what is present in
a few laboratory thermometers. We keep these thermometers in sealed wooden
cases and only use them for specific lab tasks. The mercury is totally
enclosed. If they break in handling, always wear gloves and personal
protective equipment to clean them up.

Once you are done playing with it you would be best to sell it. Mercury is
normally sold in "flasks". A flask is a 76 pound unit. The price varies
and may be from 100 to 200 dollars per flask I don't know where you could
sell it nor how you could dispose of it. If you don't already own it, don't
buy it or "obtain" it unless you have a plan on how you will get rid of it.
Always wear gloves and personal protective equipment.

Mark
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-10 19:17:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
It's easier to tell you what you should NOT do with the mercury rather than
what to do with it. It can be absorbed into the body through the skin or
inhaled through vapors. There won't be much vapor at room temperature but
there will be some. Make sure there is always ventilation. Don't handle it
bare-handed, especially with jewelry on. The gold will form an amalgamation
with the mercury. A shiny piece of gold jewelry will become dull.
Jeeze, when I was a young kid (pre-1950) we used to rub mercury on the
then real silver US coins with our fingers and it would grab onto them
and make them look REAL shiny for about a day, before all the mercury
got amalgamated - then they'd look like "shite".

So how come I and all the other kids are still here to tell about it? <G>

Jeff (Who turned in his last little vial of mercury during our town's
"thermometer drive" about five year's ago.)
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Gerald Miller
2004-11-11 03:16:19 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:17:02 -0500, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Jeeze, when I was a young kid (pre-1950) we used to rub mercury on the
then real silver US coins with our fingers and it would grab onto them
and make them look REAL shiny for about a day, before all the mercury
got amalgamated - then they'd look like "shite".
So how come I and all the other kids are still here to tell about it? <G>
Jeff (Who turned in his last little vial of mercury during our town's
"thermometer drive" about five year's ago.)
I used to dissect grandpa's hearing aid batteries to get the mercury,
then rub it on pennies so we could try to pass them off as dimes to
buy a bag of chips and get a nickel change back.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-11 04:12:03 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 22:16:19 -0500, the renowned Gerald Miller
Post by Gerald Miller
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:17:02 -0500, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Jeeze, when I was a young kid (pre-1950) we used to rub mercury on the
then real silver US coins with our fingers and it would grab onto them
and make them look REAL shiny for about a day, before all the mercury
got amalgamated - then they'd look like "shite".
So how come I and all the other kids are still here to tell about it? <G>
Jeff (Who turned in his last little vial of mercury during our town's
"thermometer drive" about five year's ago.)
I used to dissect grandpa's hearing aid batteries to get the mercury,
then rub it on pennies so we could try to pass them off as dimes to
buy a bag of chips and get a nickel change back.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Nickel bags of chips? Hmm.. hearing aid batteries? ca. 1964?


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Gerald Miller
2004-11-11 04:12:02 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:12:03 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
Post by Spehro Pefhany
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 22:16:19 -0500, the renowned Gerald Miller
Post by Gerald Miller
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:17:02 -0500, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Jeeze, when I was a young kid (pre-1950) we used to rub mercury on the
then real silver US coins with our fingers and it would grab onto them
and make them look REAL shiny for about a day, before all the mercury
got amalgamated - then they'd look like "shite".
So how come I and all the other kids are still here to tell about it? <G>
Jeff (Who turned in his last little vial of mercury during our town's
"thermometer drive" about five year's ago.)
I used to dissect grandpa's hearing aid batteries to get the mercury,
then rub it on pennies so we could try to pass them off as dimes to
buy a bag of chips and get a nickel change back.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Nickel bags of chips? Hmm.. hearing aid batteries? ca. 1964?
Try at least ten years earlier.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
edard
2004-11-11 04:34:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerald Miller
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:12:03 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
Post by Spehro Pefhany
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 22:16:19 -0500, the renowned Gerald Miller
Post by Gerald Miller
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 14:17:02 -0500, Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Jeeze, when I was a young kid (pre-1950) we used to rub mercury on the
then real silver US coins with our fingers and it would grab onto them
and make them look REAL shiny for about a day, before all the mercury
got amalgamated - then they'd look like "shite".
So how come I and all the other kids are still here to tell about it? <G>
Jeff (Who turned in his last little vial of mercury during our town's
"thermometer drive" about five year's ago.)
I used to dissect grandpa's hearing aid batteries to get the mercury,
then rub it on pennies so we could try to pass them off as dimes to
buy a bag of chips and get a nickel change back.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Nickel bags of chips? Hmm.. hearing aid batteries? ca. 1964?
Try at least ten years earlier.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Yeah, back in the '50s (before mercury was poison) I got hold of several AA
size mercury cells. Smashing them with a hammer exposed a bluish "clay"
that glistened with mercury. I made a centrifuge of sorts that attached to
an electric fan to render out the mercury. A manometer has been suggested
so how about a barometer?
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-11 04:24:04 UTC
Permalink
Spehro Pefhany wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Spehro Pefhany
Nickel bags of chips? Hmm.. hearing aid batteries? ca. 1964?
Were you implying that the mercury cell wasn't around in 1964?

Panasonic says they had them in 1955:

http://panasonic.co.jp/rekishikan/en/product/product03.html

The transmitters in the USA's first successful Vanguard I satellite
launched in 1958, were powered by mercury cells. (DAMHIKT)

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-11 04:44:23 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:24:04 -0500, the renowned Jeff Wisnia
Post by Jeff Wisnia
<snipped>
Post by Spehro Pefhany
Nickel bags of chips? Hmm.. hearing aid batteries? ca. 1964?
Were you implying that the mercury cell wasn't around in 1964?
http://panasonic.co.jp/rekishikan/en/product/product03.html
The transmitters in the USA's first successful Vanguard I satellite
launched in 1958, were powered by mercury cells. (DAMHIKT)
Jeff
No, I was (wrongly) estimating when the first transistorized hearing
aids would have been commercialized.

And I do think I recall silver bags of Hostess chips for $.05 when I
was a small boy, but the big bags were a dime.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Gerald Miller
2004-11-11 04:51:40 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:44:23 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
Post by Spehro Pefhany
And I do think I recall silver bags of Hostess chips for $.05 when I
was a small boy, but the big bags were a dime.
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
Yes, but by that time the bag cost more than the chips. Grandpa's
first hearing aid fit in a special large shirt pocket with a cut out
for the microphone and the battery pack fit on his belt, a dentist
made the earpiece. I still have hearing aid vacuum tubes somewhere
down in my "good things."
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Gunner
2004-11-11 07:34:06 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:44:23 -0500, Spehro Pefhany
Post by Spehro Pefhany
And I do think I recall silver bags of Hostess chips for $.05 when I
was a small boy, but the big bags were a dime.
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
Potato chips often came in a big tin. About 2lbs for $1 or so.

Gunner



"If I'm going to reach out to the the Democrats then I need a third
hand.There's no way I'm letting go of my wallet or my gun while they're
around."

"Democrat. In the dictionary it's right after demobilize and right
before demode` (out of fashion).
-Buddy Jordan 2001
Dave
2004-11-11 20:07:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gunner
Potato chips often came in a big tin. About 2lbs for $1 or so.
Gunner
Charles Chips, when I was a kid. Delivered via truck, like milk.
Return the tins, get more chips. Magic!

Back to the topic of mercury, as I was reading this thread last night,
I was hearing on the local news (Atlanta) about a Sierra Club study that
found unacceptable levels of mercury in 1/6 th of random fish samples
(not just tuna, but farm raised catfish, also) from local big chain
supermarkets. Mercury as we know screws up people; kids mostly.
Bottom line was that much of the mercury comes from coal fired power
plants, and there is a push to get GW to honor some clean air act, due
up sometime in the near future. I need to research this, and will.

So, Gunner...please write or call or E-mail Your Commander-in-Chief;
My President,as I am, So that the air our grankids breath, and the fish
they catch and eat in the wilderness as an exercise in *miscellaneous
survival skills* (ahem) will not scramble their little brains.

I am a left wing nutcase radical lamppost swinging candidate to think
this way, I know. Maybe I should crosspost to altcarlmaldennose so's
I'll swing a bit more right <G>

~Dave
Hitch
2004-11-11 20:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave
I was hearing on the local news (Atlanta) about a Sierra Club study that
found unacceptable levels of mercury in 1/6 th of random fish samples
(not just tuna, but farm raised catfish, also) from local big chain
supermarkets. Mercury as we know screws up people; kids mostly.
Also, I read recently that the higher-priced, higher-quality, albacore tuna
had the most mercury. The cheap stuff was the better bargain, not only in
price, but in health cost, too. Good thing I like the cheap stuff better.
--
John Snow
"Pull hard and it comes easy"
Dave
2004-11-12 00:03:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hitch
Also, I read recently that the higher-priced, higher-quality, albacore tuna
had the most mercury. The cheap stuff was the better bargain, not only in
price, but in health cost, too. Good thing I like the cheap stuff better.
Yes. Albacore is higher up on the food chain. More mercury
accumulation.

I wonder how much mercury is in G*****'s Coyote and jelly sammiches?

Must be some; he's ...bolts.

~D
Ivan Vegvary
2004-11-10 03:40:46 UTC
Permalink
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
arrangement. I know one clock collector (50± large clocks) that really
prizes and guards his large volume of mercury.
Don't really know why, since, if I remember my physics correctly (40+ years
ago) pendulum action is strictly a variable of length and not weight.
Others might comment.

Ivan Vegvary
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Ron Moore
2004-11-10 03:55:02 UTC
Permalink
As the pendulum rod would expand (lengthen) due to heat, the mercury
would expand upwards in the vial to compensate.
Respectfully,
Ron Moore
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
arrangement. I know one clock collector (50± large clocks) that really
prizes and guards his large volume of mercury.
Don't really know why, since, if I remember my physics correctly (40+ years
ago) pendulum action is strictly a variable of length and not weight.
Others might comment.
Ivan Vegvary
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-10 19:31:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ron Moore
As the pendulum rod would expand (lengthen) due to heat, the mercury
would expand upwards in the vial to compensate.
Respectfully,
Ron Moore
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
arrangement. I know one clock collector (50± large clocks) that really
prizes and guards his large volume of mercury.
Don't really know why, since, if I remember my physics correctly (40+ years
ago) pendulum action is strictly a variable of length and not weight.
Others might comment.
Ivan Vegvary
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the
obvious,
Post by williamhenry
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Then someone got clever and they developed those pendulums where the
"shaft" was a zig zag of alternating brass and steel rods cleverly
arranged so the summed temperature induced length changes canceled to zero.


We've got a replica "Regulator" pendulum clock hanging in our kitchen,
and it's temperature sensitive to the tune of about a minute a day
between summer and winter. I keep meaning to play around with attaching
a little srip of bimetal (swiped from a defunct thermostat) to the
backside of the pendulum which could raise and lower a tiny weight in
response to temperature. Maybe I'll get to it this year...

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Erik
2004-11-10 08:16:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
arrangement. I know one clock collector (50± large clocks) that really
prizes and guards his large volume of mercury.
Don't really know why, since, if I remember my physics correctly (40+ years
ago) pendulum action is strictly a variable of length and not weight.
Others might comment.
Weren't some old plumb bob's mercury filled as well?

Erik
Gunner
2004-11-10 16:59:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
arrangement. I know one clock collector (50± large clocks) that really
prizes and guards his large volume of mercury.
Don't really know why, since, if I remember my physics correctly (40+ years
ago) pendulum action is strictly a variable of length and not weight.
Others might comment.
Weren't some old plumb bob's mercury filled as well?
Erik
Indeed. I have a Starret one.

Gunner



"If I'm going to reach out to the the Democrats then I need a third
hand.There's no way I'm letting go of my wallet or my gun while they're
around."

"Democrat. In the dictionary it's right after demobilize and right
before demode` (out of fashion).
-Buddy Jordan 2001
Charles A. Sherwood
2004-11-10 17:31:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???

chuck
pyotr filipivich
2004-11-15 01:29:44 UTC
Permalink
I missed the staff meeting but the minutes show
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???
Check the relative density. If mercury is denser than Lead, you don't
need as much volume.

OTOH, both metal have bad "side effects" for prolonged exposure, which
is what has the enviro-weenies freaking out.


tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
Niccol wrote "It used to be that the USA was pretty good at
producing stuff teenaged boys could lose a finger or two playing with."
Robert Galloway
2004-11-15 19:04:49 UTC
Permalink
If memory serves, lead is around 11 gm/cc. Mercury around 13. Figures
are not exact but not a huge difference either.

bob g.
Post by pyotr filipivich
I missed the staff meeting but the minutes show
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
Post by Ivan Vegvary
Many antique (and possibly new) clocks use mercury in their pendulum
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???
Check the relative density. If mercury is denser than Lead, you don't
need as much volume.
OTOH, both metal have bad "side effects" for prolonged exposure, which
is what has the enviro-weenies freaking out.
tschus
pyotr
Charles A. Sherwood
2004-11-15 22:48:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Galloway
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???
If memory serves, lead is around 11 gm/cc. Mercury around 13. Figures
are not exact but not a huge difference either.
I believe the denser the pendulum bob, the more accurate the clock.
However, I not going to mess with mercury for now.
Martin H. Eastburn
2004-11-16 06:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
Post by Robert Galloway
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???
If memory serves, lead is around 11 gm/cc. Mercury around 13. Figures
are not exact but not a huge difference either.
I believe the denser the pendulum bob, the more accurate the clock.
However, I not going to mess with mercury for now.
Depleted Uranium :-)
--
Martin Eastburn, Barbara Eastburn
@ home at Lion's Lair with our computer ***@pacbell.net
NRA LOH, NRA Life
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Randal O'Brian
2004-11-16 18:12:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
Post by Robert Galloway
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
I am building W.R.Smiths Lyre clock. Maybe I could use mercury in
the pendulum instead of lead???
If memory serves, lead is around 11 gm/cc. Mercury around 13. Figures
are not exact but not a huge difference either.
I believe the denser the pendulum bob, the more accurate the clock.
However, I not going to mess with mercury for now.
You could use tungsten. www.mcmaster.com sells machinable tungsten alloy
rods. About 18.5 gm/cc.

Randy
Ron Moore
2004-11-10 03:41:14 UTC
Permalink
In some old pendulum master clocks, the weight itself was a mercury vial
that would compensate for temperature changes by
expanding/contracting. So, if you have an old grandfather clock around
and want real accuracy.....
Respectfully,
Ron Moore
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Billl Liggett
2004-11-10 08:43:37 UTC
Permalink
The largest users of pure mercury were the gold rush bunch in the late 19th
century. After they had panned for gold, they used mercury to combine with
the gold dust in their pans. They then took the ammalgemated mass and put it
into a potato that had been halved, then cored. They wired the potato
together, and put it into a bed of coals. The mercury went into the meat,
the gold was left as a ball. Some say they left the potato to be eaten by
wild critters, that then later died. They ate the critters.

Justice through ignorance?
Karl Vorwerk
2004-11-10 10:22:50 UTC
Permalink
It's still used in some South American gold fields. They drive the mercury
out by heating the amalgam. Needless to say not a very healthy occupation.
Karl
Post by Billl Liggett
The largest users of pure mercury were the gold rush bunch in the late 19th
century. After they had panned for gold, they used mercury to combine with
the gold dust in their pans. They then took the ammalgemated mass and put it
into a potato that had been halved, then cored. They wired the potato
together, and put it into a bed of coals. The mercury went into the meat,
the gold was left as a ball. Some say they left the potato to be eaten by
wild critters, that then later died. They ate the critters.
Justice through ignorance?
---
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Jordan
2004-11-10 12:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Barometer?
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-10 13:44:47 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 23:23:43 +1100, the renowned Jordan
Post by Jordan
Barometer?
Manometer?

Huge Hg-in-glass thermometer?


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
jim rozen
2004-11-10 13:06:04 UTC
Permalink
In article <B5dkd.757$***@bignews4.bellsouth.net>, williamhenry says...

Mercury?

It used to be used in McLoud vaccuum gages.

Jim
--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-10 14:16:27 UTC
Permalink
On 10 Nov 2004 05:06:04 -0800, the renowned jim rozen
Post by jim rozen
Mercury?
It used to be used in McLoud vaccuum gages.
Jim
McLeod. Diffusion pumps too, IIRC,


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Boris Mohar
2004-11-10 17:40:26 UTC
Permalink
Organic mercury compounds are even scarier.

http://acadprojwww.wlu.edu/vol4/BlackmerH/public_html/xliberty/chem/wetterhahn.html
--
Boris Mohar
HoloBarre©®
2004-11-10 18:40:04 UTC
Permalink
Mercury used to be used in organic chemistry syntheses, called
oxy-mercuration, IIRC. Might could sell it to labs that employ this and
possibly other methods.
Mercury switches were quite popular at one time.
Zinc may be somewhat of an antidote for Hg poisoning; it is I
believe so for Cadmium, as they all lie in the same periodic column. But
this is complicated a little by the fact that it is supposedly methylated
mercury, not pure Hg itself, which is the offending toxin.
Yeah, and Vit C. :)
Very neat stuff, but clearly w/ overhead. Make sure the
container is substantial, w/ a very good lid, as pneumatic shock can rocket
the Hg right thru small plastic lids. Maybe make the lid a permanent seal,
as the temptation to take mercury out and play with it is almost
irresistable.
----------------------------
Mr. P.V.'d
formerly Droll Troll
Post by Boris Mohar
Organic mercury compounds are even scarier.
http://acadprojwww.wlu.edu/vol4/BlackmerH/public_html/xliberty/chem/wetterhahn.html
--
Boris Mohar
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-10 19:44:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.

See:

http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm

Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?

Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used. Since so many of the folks working
with it started going nuts, it gave birth to the expression "Mad as a
hatter", as in the "Alice in Wonderland" character, "The mad Hatter".


Just as bad was the radiation sickness effects on those poor ladies who
used to paint the numbers on luminous watch dials year after year using
radium activated paints. They "put a point on" their tiny paintbrushes
with their lips hundreds of times in a workday.

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Pete Bergstrom
2004-11-10 19:50:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
Honeywell still makes a *lot* of Round thermostats:
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc%2fsearchResults.jsp&BV_SessionID=@@@@0974980764.1100116103@@@@&BV_EngineID=ccccadddddkmggmcgelceffdfgidgmj.0&MID=9876

The machine that makes them is supposed to be pretty impressive - I didn't
make the time to get a tour while I worked at Honeywell and I regret that
now.

Pete
Ken Davey
2004-11-10 20:07:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete Bergstrom
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
The machine that makes them is supposed to be pretty impressive - I
didn't make the time to get a tour while I worked at Honeywell and I
regret that now.
Pete
Wind a small coil of small gauge wire (copper works best) - it should look
like an open spring. Suspend it and let the lower end touch a pool (drop) of
murcury. Send a DC current (one 'C' cell will do it) through the coil -
murcury is connected to cell and coil is connected (at the top) to opposite
polarity.
Interesting demonstration of the magnetic fields set up in a current
carrying wire.
RegardsKen (who 'invented' this demonstration waaaaay back)
--
http://www.rupert.net/~solar
Return address supplied by 'spammotel'
http://www.spammotel.com
Tim Williams
2004-11-10 19:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used.
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?

...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?

Tim

--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Peter T. Keillor III
2004-11-11 00:26:49 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:54:34 -0600, "Tim Williams"
Post by Tim Williams
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used.
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?
...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?
Tim
Peter T. Keillor III
2004-11-11 00:32:46 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:54:34 -0600, "Tim Williams"
Post by Tim Williams
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used.
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?
...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?
Tim
My father in law, who passed away a couple of years ago, once
described getting a "through" of calomel as a child in West Texas!
Jumping Jehosophat! It obviously didn't kill him, so I asked him to
describe the circumstances.

Apparently his sister and he both got disentery when he was a child.
The good country doctor prescribed the "through of calomel", which was
some small dose of Hg2Cl2, chased with about a quart of castor oil.
The net effect was the poison sterilized his digestive tract, and the
castor oil guaranteed that the poison didn't linger long enough to be
absorbed in a fatal dose. Apparently, it worked. He said he still
remembered the day in the outhouse.

Pete Keillor
axolotl
2004-11-11 01:03:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Keillor III
The good country doctor prescribed the "through of calomel", which was
some small dose of Hg2Cl2,
Calomel was a treatment for syphilis before antibiotics. The sailor's
phrase was "One night with Venus, six weeks with Mercury".

Kevin Gallimore


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Grunty Grogan
2004-11-11 01:27:50 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 13:54:34 -0600, "Tim Williams"
Post by Tim Williams
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?
The felt mat was treated with lye to solvate the hair (keratin),
making it sticky. When the wet mat was formed to a wooden waxed
mandrel or form (Sych as for a het) the molded item was then placed in
mercuric chloride ("Corrosive sublimate of Mercury"). Mercury like
some other metals, is a powerful protien coagulant that crosslinked
the protiens in the felt, making the molding "permanent".
Mercury has an affinity for sulfur compounds, with tragic results in
the brain and nervous system.
Organothiols are still called "Mercaptans" (Commonly used in odorizing
fuel gases, and the n-Butyl compound is used for defense by skunks).
If a victim of mercury poisoning could be dosed with mercaptans, it
locked the Hg up as the insoluble sulfide.
Post by Tim Williams
...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?
Up to a point, and if removed in time they might recover somewhat.
The halflife of Hg in the body was at one time reported to be 77 days.
I had mercury poisoning decades ago, an acute industrial exposure. I
was fired from that job, due to uncontrollable rage...which probably
saved my life. No one realized what was going on, till one clueful
doctor called for a Heavy Metals test.
It's (trust me) really really bad. If you want to screw around with a
room temperature liquid metal, buy some of that gallium eutectic.
Stay away from mercury.
And to the guy who wants to bring an Hg project to a school: I am
sure you can do it safely, but in this tort environment, all you need
is one kid to go home and tell his lawyer parent about it, and you'll
hear "Reckless Endangerment", in which case, just go home and light
your curtains. Of COURSE it can be handled safely...but facts have
nothing to do with some people.
Colin Gibson
2004-11-11 03:20:17 UTC
Permalink
Build a manometer to balance carburettors on engines with more than one carburettor.

Regards
Colin
Bruce L. Bergman
2004-11-12 03:50:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colin Gibson
Build a manometer to balance carburettors on engines with more than one carburettor.
Regards
Colin
Nahh, that one's a lot easier with a Uni-Syn. An adjustable venturi
plate with a floating-ball manometer is sufficient - and can't spill.

Used to be able to dial in dual carbs in 2 minutes flat without
reading the manual - but that was when I was fussing with something
every week or two, and messing up the crossover linkage.

--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, Woodland Hills (Los Angeles) CA - Desktop
Electrician for Westend Electric - CA726700
5737 Kanan Rd. #359, Agoura CA 91301 (818) 889-9545
Spamtrapped address: Remove the python and the invalid, and use a net.
George E. Cawthon
2004-11-11 06:07:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Williams
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used.
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?
...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?
Tim
--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Sounds like something a mercury manufacture or a manufacture that uses
mercury would say. You might want to review the well documented
mercury problem that existed in Japan in the ?60s?
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-11 06:48:13 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 06:07:50 GMT, the renowned "George E. Cawthon"
Post by George E. Cawthon
Post by Tim Williams
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used.
Mercuric chloride, I forget what for; fixing color or stiffening or
something?
...Last mercury thread we had here, someone said mercury wears off over
time. Thus mad hatters get better after taking a few months off work. Who
said that?
Tim
--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Sounds like something a mercury manufacture or a manufacture that uses
mercury would say. You might want to review the well documented
mercury problem that existed in Japan in the ?60s?
Minamata Japan. Organic mercury compounds discharged Chisso Chemical
Company. Ingested by the population of a fishing village in the late
1950s. The company only was forced to pay compensation relatively
recently. American Eugene Smith became an activist on this matter and
brought it to the world's attention. For his trouble, he was beaten
almost to death by company thugs.

Here is one of his most famous images (it's a copyright infringment,
of course)

Loading Image...

I've been through Smith's archives at the University of Arizona, and
done some study of the matter. The girl in the photo, Tomoko Uemura,
died on December 7, 1977 according to a private e-mail I got recently.
She was born in 1956.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Dave
2004-11-12 00:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Spehro Thanks for this. I think I saw it for the first time in Nat Geo
back in the early 70's, along with the article on mercury mentioned by
another poster showing a pic of a guy floating on a pool of it.

Off Topic though...google "Clean air" and/or "Clear skies"
"clear Skies"...snort...doublespeak junk appeal to soccer moms
Post by Spehro Pefhany
Here is one of his most famous images (it's a copyright infringment,
of course)
http://www.pku.edu.cn/life/xuehui/yasp/pic-sheyingdashi/eugene%20smith/Tomoko%20Uemura%20in%20Her%20Bath.jpg
I've been through Smith's archives at the University of Arizona, and
done some study of the matter. The girl in the photo, Tomoko Uemura,
died on December 7, 1977 according to a private e-mail I got recently.
She was born in 1956.
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
jim rozen
2004-11-11 15:44:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by George E. Cawthon
Sounds like something a mercury manufacture or a manufacture that uses
mercury would say. You might want to review the well documented
mercury problem that existed in Japan in the ?60s?
Minimata's disease is caused by organic mercury compounds,
mostly methyl mercury IIRC. Metallic mercury is a kitty cat
in comparison.

Jim
--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
pyotr filipivich
2004-11-15 01:47:29 UTC
Permalink
I missed the staff meeting but the minutes show jim rozen
Post by jim rozen
Post by George E. Cawthon
Sounds like something a mercury manufacture or a manufacture that uses
mercury would say. You might want to review the well documented
mercury problem that existed in Japan in the ?60s?
Minimata's disease is caused by organic mercury compounds,
mostly methyl mercury IIRC. Metallic mercury is a kitty cat
in comparison.
And, it was a continual exposure, not something she (or anyone) could
"get away from".

What the original poster was observing is that in many cases, if you
can get the person away from the heavy metal exposure, it will cease
accumulating in the system and eventual they will "get better".
Unfortunately, it doesn't always work that way, some of the compounds cause
serious problems of their own, and some have seriously long bio-half-lives.
(Strontium 90, Cesium are two which come to mind.)

"Better living through chemistry" sometimes means "Oh shit, this stuff
is worse than we thought!".

tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
Niccol wrote "It used to be that the USA was pretty good at
producing stuff teenaged boys could lose a finger or two playing with."
Joe Gorman
2004-11-10 19:59:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
Another old time use for mercury was in the manufacture of felt hats,
I'm not sure just HOW it was used. Since so many of the folks working
with it started going nuts, it gave birth to the expression "Mad as a
hatter", as in the "Alice in Wonderland" character, "The mad Hatter".
Just as bad was the radiation sickness effects on those poor ladies who
used to paint the numbers on luminous watch dials year after year using
radium activated paints. They "put a point on" their tiny paintbrushes
with their lips hundreds of times in a workday.
Jeff
http://www.snopes.com/language/phrases/hatter.htm
resolution: undetermined
while this reference claims it to be true
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-mad2.htm
and there are 23.899 more possible answers
http://alltheweb.com/search?advanced=1&cat=web&jsact=&_stype=norm&type=phrase&q=mad+as+a+hatter&_b_query=&l=en&ics=utf-8&cs=utf8&wf%5Bn%5D=3&wf%5B0%5D%5Br%5D=%2B&wf%5B0%5D%5Bq%5D=&wf%5B0%5D%5Bw%5D=&wf%5B1%5D%5Br%5D=%2B&wf%5B1%5D%5Bq%5D=&wf%5B1%5D%5Bw%5D=&wf%5B2%5D%5Br%5D=-&wf%5B2%5D%5Bq%5D=&wf%5B2%5D%5Bw%5D=&dincl=&dexcl=&geo=&doctype=&dfr%5Bd%5D=1&dfr%5Bm%5D=1&dfr%5By%5D=1980&dto%5Bd%5D=10&dto%5Bm%5D=11&dto%5By%5D=2004&hits=10
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-10 20:50:28 UTC
Permalink
Joe Gorman wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Joe Gorman
while this reference claims it to be true
http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-mad2.htm
That reference tought me what the hatter's mercury was used for, thanks.

*************************************************************************
A complicated set of processes was needed to turn the fur into a
finished hat. With the cheaper sorts of fur, an early step was to brush
a solution of a mercury compound—usually mercurous nitrate—on to the fur
to roughen the fibres and make them mat more easily, a process called
carroting because it made the fur turn orange. Beaver fur had natural
serrated edges that made this unnecessary, one reason why it was
preferred, but the cost and scarcity of beaver meant that other furs had
to be used.
*************************************************************************

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
Mark
2004-11-11 02:56:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
I'm sure there are plenty of them, perhaps millions, installed and in use
even if they are not being manufactured. They are all sealed systems with
the mercury not coming onto contact with persons through direct handling.
When they need to be replaced they should be disposed of properly:

http://www.ohiodnr.com/recycling/awareness/facts/factsheets/mercury.htm

There are plenty of things that could be done with the mercury but
personally I don't think the risks in handling it are worth the fun of the
activity in this case. YMMV.

Mark
n***@sny.der.on.ca
2004-11-11 05:14:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 02:56:28 GMT, "Mark"
Post by Mark
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
Tilt operated switches for trunk and underhood lights on cars also
use(d) mercury switches, as do explosion proof limit switches.
Mercury whetted contacts used to be common on some industrial relays
too, if my memory serves correctly.
Post by Mark
I'm sure there are plenty of them, perhaps millions, installed and in use
even if they are not being manufactured. They are all sealed systems with
the mercury not coming onto contact with persons through direct handling.
http://www.ohiodnr.com/recycling/awareness/facts/factsheets/mercury.htm
There are plenty of things that could be done with the mercury but
personally I don't think the risks in handling it are worth the fun of the
activity in this case. YMMV.
Mark
Spehro Pefhany
2004-11-11 05:34:31 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 00:14:42 -0500, the renowned
Post by n***@sny.der.on.ca
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 02:56:28 GMT, "Mark"
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Well, since no one's mentioned it yet, there are huge numbers of wall
thermostats still in use all over the place which have tilt actuated
mercury switches in them. I've got two in my home and two at the office.
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
Tilt operated switches for trunk and underhood lights on cars also
use(d) mercury switches,
I thought they'd moved to rolling ball type contacts?
Post by n***@sny.der.on.ca
as do explosion proof limit switches.
Mercury whetted contacts used to be common on some industrial relays
too, if my memory serves correctly.
There are mercury wetted reed relays, and mercury displacement
contactors. The first contain very little mercury, the latter quite a
bit.


Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany
--
"it's the network..." "The Journey is the reward"
***@interlog.com Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog Info for designers: http://www.speff.com
Erik
2004-11-11 06:00:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spehro Pefhany
Post by n***@sny.der.on.ca
Tilt operated switches for trunk and underhood lights on cars also
use(d) mercury switches,
I thought they'd moved to rolling ball type contacts?
There were many millions of mercury switches used for hood and trunk
lights. I saw on TV a few years ago where junk yards are required to
remove them... they showed a shot of a whole bucket full of them one
yard had collected for recycling.

A lot of older gas appliances had mercury pilot 'sensors', or whatever
they called them.

There was another big flap a while back about some of those children's
tennis shoes with the flashing lights having mercury switches IIRC.

Erik
pyotr filipivich
2004-11-15 01:47:31 UTC
Permalink
I missed the staff meeting but the minutes show
Post by n***@sny.der.on.ca
Post by Jeff Wisnia
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-thermostat1.htm
Anyone know if they are still selling ones like that?
Tilt operated switches for trunk and underhood lights on cars also
use(d) mercury switches, as do explosion proof limit switches.
Mercury whetted contacts used to be common on some industrial relays
too, if my memory serves correctly.
Heck, the early Hollerith Tabulators (The machines which introduced
punch cards to the world for data processing) used electrified needles
dipping into mercury through holes in the punch cards to close circuits and
increment counters. Completed the Census of 1890 in a year or so (the 1880
census had been finished in 1888, IIRC, and the estimate for the 1890
census would have it completed around 1900. Not Good. hence Hollerith was
able to sell the census bureau on the new technology.)

Yeah, I sued to be a History Major.

tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich.
as an explaination for the decline in the US's tech edge, James
Niccol wrote "It used to be that the USA was pretty good at
producing stuff teenaged boys could lose a finger or two playing with."
Winston
2004-11-15 02:37:25 UTC
Permalink
pyotr filipivich wrote:
(....)
Post by pyotr filipivich
Yeah, I sued to be a History Major.
A Freudian slip is when you say one thing and you mean your mother.

:)

--Winston
Koz
2004-11-10 20:02:05 UTC
Permalink
Just because it looks cool (and going by 20 year old memory):

If you get some silver chloride in distilled water, it makes a nice
clear solution. One drop of mercury metal in the liguid and silver
crystals start forming (look like little spears). Other than the fact
that the liquid has changed to mercuric chloride (a nasty again), the
siler crystals could make a cool display if you can seal off the whole
thing.

Koz
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
Rick
2004-11-10 20:12:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I used to run mercury porosimetry tests on catalytic converter
substrates-great fun!

I remember seeing an article in National Geographic about mercury mining.
They showed a guy sitting on a pool of mercury. When you were first hired,
you signed your name on a card. When your signature deteriorated enough it
was time to retire....
Charles A. Sherwood
2004-11-10 20:48:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rick
I remember seeing an article in National Geographic about mercury mining.
They showed a guy sitting on a pool of mercury.
So could you walk on a pool of mercury? Mercury is so dense you
would probably on "sink" in about knee deep. Maybe toxic but it
sure sounds like fun.
Tim Williams
2004-11-11 01:20:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles A. Sherwood
Post by Rick
I remember seeing an article in National Geographic about mercury mining.
They showed a guy sitting on a pool of mercury.
So could you walk on a pool of mercury? Mercury is so dense you
would probably on "sink" in about knee deep. Maybe toxic but it
sure sounds like fun.
http://www.theodoregray.com/PeriodicTable/Elements/080/index.s7.html

If a person is about specific gravity = 1 and mercury = 13.6, only 1/13.6th
of you needs to be submerged, or at least below the untouched surface. If
you had uniform cross-section, that's 5.3 inches - obviously your legs or
hands represent less than your torso, so I'd expect as much as a foot deep.
If you could even maintain balance. You can walk on a pool of mercury as
well as you can walk on a pool of water (given the extra bouyancy needed).

Tim

--
"I've got more trophies than Wayne Gretsky and the Pope combined!"
- Homer Simpson
Website @ http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/tmoranwms
Jeff Wisnia
2004-11-11 15:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I recently picked up this interesting link about other "shiny" room
temperature liquid metals; apologies if it was on this newsgroup.

http://www.scitoys.com/scitoys/scitoys/thermo/liquid_metal/liquid_metal.html

Jeff
--
My name is Jeff Wisnia and I approved this message....

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"As long as there are final exams, there will be prayer in public
schools"
DEin2000
2004-11-13 02:08:25 UTC
Permalink
Use it to harden drill bits to drill hardened metal parts.
asdf
2004-11-17 05:04:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by williamhenry
say, one was to acquire a decent sum of mercury, about eight liquid ounces
what are the possibilities?
already thought of poisoning myself , before anyone points out the obvious,
I thought about trying to recreate the aluminum decomposing trick that was
just in popsci
I don't know the possibilities but I guess I'll tell my mercury
story. 1980 I believe and I was in 8th grade. There was a huge
locker full of science experiment type chemicals that were never
used for anything. Looking in it I was amazed at the stuff there
was. I asked my teacher if I could have some of the stuff so I
took some silver nitrate and copper sulfate (IIRC) and a bunch of
mercury. I showed some other guys the mercury and there were a
a bunch of us holding as much as our hands would hold. One guy
who was pretty high strung threw a handful across the unoccupied
lab. We thought it was cool when it splattered because it kinda
disappeared. I took my mercury home and played with it in a
shoe box lid occasionally. It's sitting on top of my fridge
as we speak in a Tostitos salsa jar. Our community collects
mercury once a year and I'm turning mine in next time. I took the
silver nitrate and mixed it with water. In it I hung a
penny and a nickel. I then connected them to my Dad's Heathkit
"Battery Eliminator". I tried to "silver" plate the penny but
I copper plated the nickel. I was totally amazed it worked and
I still have it.
DoN. Nichols
2004-11-19 04:04:20 UTC
Permalink
[ ... ]
Post by asdf
I asked my teacher if I could have some of the stuff so I
took some silver nitrate and copper sulfate (IIRC) and a bunch of
mercury.
I took the
silver nitrate and mixed it with water. In it I hung a
penny and a nickel. I then connected them to my Dad's Heathkit
"Battery Eliminator". I tried to "silver" plate the penny but
I copper plated the nickel. I was totally amazed it worked and
I still have it.
If you do photoprocessing, a silver nitrate solution in a bottle
which will release a single drop at a time makes a good test for
photographic fixer. Pour a little of the fixer into a test tube (or
something similar) and drop a single drop of the AgNO3 solution into it.
If the fixer is fresh, it will just mix in. As the fixer gets more and
more used, a white cloud will form around the drop, and slowly dissolve.
The longer it takes to dissolve, the closer you are to needing to mix a
fresh batch of fixer. If it just hangs there and doesn't dissolve, it is
truly time to send that fixer to whoever reclaims silver from it, and
mix the next batch.

A one or two ounce dropper bottle will last for decades -- even
longer with the digital photography edging aside the chemical-based
process. :-)

Enjoy,
DoN.
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