Discussion:
spray paint can question
(too old to reply)
Grant Erwin
2005-09-26 18:23:43 UTC
Permalink
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?

How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.

Ideas? Experience?

GWE
p***@coinet.com
2005-09-26 18:47:15 UTC
Permalink
Can we assume you have tried pulling the nozzle off and replacing it
with a fresh one from another can? Surely you have other spray cans. I
think any other way would result in paint all over yourself.

Paul in Redmond, OR
Gerald Miller
2005-09-27 01:44:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@coinet.com
Can we assume you have tried pulling the nozzle off and replacing it
with a fresh one from another can? Surely you have other spray cans. I
think any other way would result in paint all over yourself.
Paul in Redmond, OR
I never toss "rattle can" nozzles - toss them in a bottle of brake
fluid for a few days then blow them out with compressed air.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Ian Stirling
2005-09-26 19:37:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
Secure the can in a vice, base down.
Put bucket closely under vice.
Hammer small nail into the bottom of the can (wearing gloves).
Nail may shoot out (not violently) on its own, or may need to be pulled
out.
I doubt that the paint will work for brushing.
The absolute pressure inside the can is small - there is no risk of it
splitting, unless you heat it first to 50C or so.
Jordan
2005-09-26 21:08:22 UTC
Permalink
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
Post by Ian Stirling
Secure the can in a vice, base down.
Put bucket closely under vice.
Hammer small nail into the bottom of the can (wearing gloves).
Dave Hinz
2005-09-26 21:16:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jordan
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
If it's upside down, the bottom _is_ the top. And the bottom is a much
better surface to try to pierce.
Jordan
2005-09-27 01:18:09 UTC
Permalink
But he said, base side down?
Post by Dave Hinz
Post by Jordan
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
If it's upside down, the bottom _is_ the top. And the bottom is a much
better surface to try to pierce.
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-27 01:35:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jordan
But he said, base side down?
Post by Dave Hinz
Post by Jordan
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
If it's upside down, the bottom _is_ the top. And the bottom is a much
better surface to try to pierce.
And it sounds like Jordan was trying to get the paint to piss out of the
bottom of the can and squirt into the bucket.

I'm skeptical, its sound from a physics basis, but likely to be VERY
messy. Especially trying to hammer a nail *upwards* at a location below
the workbench, with a bucket in the way no less.

And how 'ya gonna grip a spray can in a vise very well, unless you make
up some curved mating jaws out of 2 by 4s or something like that.

Fess up Jordan, have you *actually* done it that way yourself?

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Jordan
2005-09-27 23:03:50 UTC
Permalink
Well, no - but that's not what I meant.
I think there might be a language problem here, or I'm not understanding
something. What I mean is, make a hole at the uppermost end of the can,
where the liquid, due to gravity, isn't.
It sounded to me like the original suggestion was to puncture the bottom
of the can, while the liquid is at the bottom ("base down").
Surely not right?
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by Dave Hinz
Post by Jordan
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
If it's upside down, the bottom _is_ the top. And the bottom is a much
better surface to try to pierce.
And it sounds like Jordan was trying to get the paint to piss out of the
bottom of the can and squirt into the bucket.
Fess up Jordan, have you *actually* done it that way yourself?
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-28 03:34:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jordan
Well, no - but that's not what I meant.
I think there might be a language problem here, or I'm not understanding
something. What I mean is, make a hole at the uppermost end of the can,
where the liquid, due to gravity, isn't.
It sounded to me like the original suggestion was to puncture the bottom
of the can, while the liquid is at the bottom ("base down").
Surely not right?
Mea Culpa and apologies, Jordan. It was actually Ian Sterling to whom I
should have addressed my skeptical remarks towards.

Sometimes quoted material in posts mixes me up and I end up picking on
the wrong poster. :-)

Jeff
Post by Jordan
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Post by Dave Hinz
Post by Jordan
Why make the hole at the bottom?
Wouldn't a hole at the top release the gas, without the paint?
If it's upside down, the bottom _is_ the top. And the bottom is a much
better surface to try to pierce.
And it sounds like Jordan was trying to get the paint to piss out of
the bottom of the can and squirt into the bucket.
Fess up Jordan, have you *actually* done it that way yourself?
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
w***@hotmail.com
2005-09-26 21:17:38 UTC
Permalink
The "use a different nozzle from another can" is the easiest and
cleanest method, as long as the paint tube isn't clogged. However, if
you really need to depressurize the can, I would think you'd want to
punch the hole as far from the pool of paint as possible. Stand the
can upright on your bench, and leave it for awhile (15 minutes?), so
that all of the paint settles to the bottom of the can. With the can
standing upright, punch the hole in the metal top (but not where the
nozzle tube comes through). The smaller the hole, the better. The air
escaping from the small hole should not take much paint, if any,
through the hole, because the air isn't pushing paint towards the hole
in the top. When the pressure is gone, you can then use some kind of
tool to open the can and pour the paint into a small bucket or similar.

Or, maybe I don't fully understand how spray paint cans work?
Doug White
2005-09-26 23:10:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by w***@hotmail.com
The "use a different nozzle from another can" is the easiest and
cleanest method, as long as the paint tube isn't clogged. However, if
you really need to depressurize the can, I would think you'd want to
punch the hole as far from the pool of paint as possible. Stand the
can upright on your bench, and leave it for awhile (15 minutes?), so
that all of the paint settles to the bottom of the can. With the can
standing upright, punch the hole in the metal top (but not where the
nozzle tube comes through). The smaller the hole, the better. The air
escaping from the small hole should not take much paint, if any,
through the hole, because the air isn't pushing paint towards the hole
in the top. When the pressure is gone, you can then use some kind of
tool to open the can and pour the paint into a small bucket or similar.
Or, maybe I don't fully understand how spray paint cans work?
I've done this with small nail. Works fine. Once the pressure is gone,
put another hole in the rim on the opposite side for a vent & pour the
paint out. It's pretty thin for brushing, but the solvent evaporates
pretty quickly, so it will thicken up a bit if you let it "breath". It's
been a while since I did this. I think I put the can on the floor in the
middle of a sheet of newspaper, and held the nail pinched in another
sheet to absorb what little spray there was. I tried to make a very
small hole, and then held the nail in place while it vented slowly.

Doug White
Franklin Newton
2005-09-26 21:00:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
The easist way to open the can is an automatic center punch, however the
paint then comes out of the hole much to rapidly to contain in a shallow
vessel!
Dave August
2005-09-26 21:11:35 UTC
Permalink
Grant,

Hell years ago (were talking early 60's) as a kid, we'd just use a 'church
key' on the bottom to make one *small* hole to let out the pressure then
open it up all the way to dump out the paint. Then 'cuz we were kids we'd
make a few more to get a hole big enough to get the *marble* out... I got a
few really nice "Cat's eyes" that way.. LOL.

Quite honestly I just did the very same thing about a week ago to a can of
Kyrlon that I wanted the last drops from to brush on the drivers on my
Locomotive.

Just hold the dam can in yer hand and point the bottom AWAY from ya...

Dave
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with
a completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick
or tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and
depressed the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all
come out and leave the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I
wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Rex B
2005-09-26 22:07:01 UTC
Permalink
I think I'm seeing the genesis of a Darwin Award!
Post by Dave August
Grant,
Hell years ago (were talking early 60's) as a kid, we'd just use a 'church
key' on the bottom to make one *small* hole to let out the pressure then
open it up all the way to dump out the paint. Then 'cuz we were kids we'd
make a few more to get a hole big enough to get the *marble* out... I got a
few really nice "Cat's eyes" that way.. LOL.
Just hold the dam can in yer hand and point the bottom AWAY from ya...
Dave
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with
a completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick
or tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and
depressed the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all
come out and leave the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I
wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Leo Lichtman
2005-09-26 22:23:54 UTC
Permalink
Of course, trying a clean nozzle would be the first thing to try. BTW, when
I start a new can, I usually use the nozzle from a can that's already in
use. I save the unused nozzles in my toolbox, so I always have a clean one
to got to when there's a problem.

I don't know why it works, but sometimes you can get the thing working by
taking off the nozzle and then putting it back. You'll get a little spurt,
and then nothing. If you repeat this a few times, often the thing will
start to work.
Grant Erwin
2005-09-26 22:35:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leo Lichtman
Of course, trying a clean nozzle would be the first thing to try. BTW, when
I start a new can, I usually use the nozzle from a can that's already in
use. I save the unused nozzles in my toolbox, so I always have a clean one
to got to when there's a problem.
I don't know why it works, but sometimes you can get the thing working by
taking off the nozzle and then putting it back. You'll get a little spurt,
and then nothing. If you repeat this a few times, often the thing will
start to work.
Yup. This one is PLUGGED. Nothing is going to get it spraying again, not a new
nozzle, nothing. And I just need a little more of the paint ..

I'll try the churchkey, sounds reasonable to me.

GWE
Dave August
2005-09-26 22:56:09 UTC
Permalink
Must be you then Rex, as in culling out the ones stupid enough not to think
and try things...

I'm 54 and have been doing this since I was 6 and NEVER had a problem, and
it was my ole man who showed me the trick...

Maybe you should try things before shooting yer mouth off.

Dave,
Post by Rex B
I think I'm seeing the genesis of a Darwin Award!
Post by Dave August
Grant,
Hell years ago (were talking early 60's) as a kid, we'd just use a
'church key' on the bottom to make one *small* hole to let out the
pressure then open it up all the way to dump out the paint. Then 'cuz we
were kids we'd make a few more to get a hole big enough to get the
*marble* out... I got a few really nice "Cat's eyes" that way.. LOL.
Just hold the dam can in yer hand and point the bottom AWAY from ya...
Dave
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with
a completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick
or tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and
depressed the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all
come out and leave the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I
wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Rex B
2005-09-27 15:24:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave August
Must be you then Rex, as in culling out the ones stupid enough not to think
and try things...
I'm 54 and have been doing this since I was 6 and NEVER had a problem, and
it was my ole man who showed me the trick...
Maybe you should try things before shooting yer mouth off.
Dave,
Hey, lighten up!

I suggest you open up a can of Humour next.
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-26 23:53:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave August
Grant,
Hell years ago (were talking early 60's) as a kid, we'd just use a 'church
key' on the bottom to make one *small* hole to let out the pressure then
open it up all the way to dump out the paint. Then 'cuz we were kids we'd
make a few more to get a hole big enough to get the *marble* out... I got a
few really nice "Cat's eyes" that way.. LOL.
Quite honestly I just did the very same thing about a week ago to a can of
Kyrlon that I wanted the last drops from to brush on the drivers on my
Locomotive.
Just hold the dam can in yer hand and point the bottom AWAY from ya...
And if you want to play it as safe as possible, put the can in the
kitchen freezer for a few hours before you pierce it. That'll reduce the
gas pressure a lot.

List me among the others who more than once have punched a spray can open.

Jeff
Post by Dave August
Dave
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with
a completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick
or tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and
depressed the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all
come out and leave the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I
wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Don Foreman
2005-09-26 22:28:44 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
its me
2005-09-26 22:41:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I have pressurized with air pressure from my compressor a paint can that has
ran out of propellant . It take some finesse but it should also blow clear
the stand tube inside the can.
Steve
Eric R Snow
2005-09-26 23:20:06 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:28:44 -0500, Don Foreman
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
Don,
That's a great idea! I can think of at least 7 people I know who could
use these. Thanks! I'm gonna make some for Christmas presents. And
anybody who has put a match to spray paint knows that the propellant
burns pretty well so propane isn't gonna hurt.
Cheers,
Eric
Don Foreman
2005-09-26 23:38:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric R Snow
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:28:44 -0500, Don Foreman
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
Don,
That's a great idea! I can think of at least 7 people I know who could
use these. Thanks! I'm gonna make some for Christmas presents. And
anybody who has put a match to spray paint knows that the propellant
burns pretty well so propane isn't gonna hurt.
Cheers,
Eric
Hints:

Not all spraycans are the same. Mike the nozzle stem from the kind of
paint usually used.

It works best if there's a little slit in the end (slitting saw),
only needs to be .050 long or so.
Eric R Snow
2005-09-27 14:20:37 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 18:38:06 -0500, Don Foreman
Post by Don Foreman
Post by Eric R Snow
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:28:44 -0500, Don Foreman
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
Don,
That's a great idea! I can think of at least 7 people I know who could
use these. Thanks! I'm gonna make some for Christmas presents. And
anybody who has put a match to spray paint knows that the propellant
burns pretty well so propane isn't gonna hurt.
Cheers,
Eric
Not all spraycans are the same. Mike the nozzle stem from the kind of
paint usually used.
It works best if there's a little slit in the end (slitting saw),
only needs to be .050 long or so.
I'll do that. Maybe there's a way to use a cone to fit several stem
sizes.
Eric
Larry Jaques
2005-09-27 20:25:30 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 16:20:06 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, Eric
Post by Eric R Snow
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 17:28:44 -0500, Don Foreman
Post by Don Foreman
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
[Your torch tips are threaded, Don? Most I've seen have straight pipe
ends.]
Post by Eric R Snow
Don,
That's a great idea! I can think of at least 7 people I know who could
use these. Thanks! I'm gonna make some for Christmas presents. And
anybody who has put a match to spray paint knows that the propellant
burns pretty well so propane isn't gonna hurt.
The flammability issue has always kept me from trying that ploy.
Having made hair-net spray cans into flame throwers, I have a lot
of respect for the contents of aerosol cans and haven't wanted to
punch a steel item (nail, churchkey) through a steel can for fear of
sparks.

[Good idea, Don. I wonder if you could just use a rubber tipped blow
gun with a small paper clip (as a valve depressor, through the side)
to accomplish the same thing.]
--
"Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not misery but
the very foundation of refinement." --William Morris
-----------------------------------
www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
Don Foreman
2005-09-28 01:42:05 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 13:25:30 -0700, Larry Jaques
Post by Larry Jaques
[Your torch tips are threaded, Don? Most I've seen have straight pipe
ends.]
The end of the burner is straight, but some disassembly is possible on
most torches. I have an old Bernz-O-Matic that accepted replacable
threaded orifices. Used that for a while. Many torches have a 5/16"
dia brass tube that screws into the valve body, even if they don't
use removable orifices. I have a B-O-M like that, and a recent one
by Goss that is also made that way. Model GP-9
http://www.gossonline.com/hand_torches.asp
available from Enco. 505-4820.

I made an adaptor that fits the threaded hole in the B-O-M valve that
accepts the stems I made to fit the old setup with the replacable
orifices.

See http://users.goldengate.net/~dforeman/rattlecan/

This is the valve body from an old B-O-M I found at a garage sale for
a buck. This is easier to use because it's a straight push down on
the propane bottle with the spraycan sitting on the bench.
Post by Larry Jaques
[Good idea, Don. I wonder if you could just use a rubber tipped blow
gun with a small paper clip (as a valve depressor, through the side)
to accomplish the same thing.]
I think that would result in paint all over the place. A trick to
this is to have the nozzle stem fit the can snugly and push it in
smartly. Then turn on the propane. It only takes a couple of
seconds to take as much as it's going to. Pull out smartly, replace
nozzle. Shake can vigorously so it won't plug again. Commence or
resume spraying!
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-26 23:58:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to screw into the
pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. The stem goes where the nozzle
was. Insert stem smartly, hold firmly, turn on propane. That will
often blow the paint tube clear, and re-pressurize the can. Saved
many rattlecans that way. Hardly ever get any on me.
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.

I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Grant Erwin
2005-09-27 00:23:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.

I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.

GWE
Mark Jerde
2005-09-27 00:35:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or
recarbonating anything fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed
Richard Kinch's advice pretty much but for the cap hardware. I just
went to the car parts store and bought some screw-on Schrader valves
and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on the Schrader
valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck soup
to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their
own pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that
went in, because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say
it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used
for MIG welding aluminum.
Yet another example of why I love lurking in this newsgroup. I like to
think I'm a pretty good make-do engineer but I'm a rank amateur here. Keep
it up!

-- Mark
Richard J Kinch
2005-09-27 04:35:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used
for MIG welding aluminum.
No, gotta be argon. When I tried it, you get something like a thermite
reaction where the molten aluminum takes the O2 off the CO2 and there's all
this amorphous C spraying around as soot.

Pretty strange to think that (oxidized) soot is what makes beverages fizz.
Don Foreman
2005-09-27 05:22:17 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 23:35:24 -0500, Richard J Kinch
Post by Richard J Kinch
Post by Grant Erwin
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used
for MIG welding aluminum.
No, gotta be argon. When I tried it, you get something like a thermite
reaction where the molten aluminum takes the O2 off the CO2 and there's all
this amorphous C spraying around as soot.
Pretty strange to think that (oxidized) soot is what makes beverages fizz.
I wonder if helium will dissolve in water. "Helium-ated" water
probably wouldn't have any flavor, but it might make some hilarious
pop for the kids talking like Donald Duck.
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-27 15:17:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 23:35:24 -0500, Richard J Kinch
Post by Richard J Kinch
Post by Grant Erwin
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used
for MIG welding aluminum.
No, gotta be argon. When I tried it, you get something like a thermite
reaction where the molten aluminum takes the O2 off the CO2 and there's all
this amorphous C spraying around as soot.
Pretty strange to think that (oxidized) soot is what makes beverages fizz.
I wonder if helium will dissolve in water. "Helium-ated" water
probably wouldn't have any flavor, but it might make some hilarious
pop for the kids talking like Donald Duck.
Particularly funny if they were "burp talking" like some folks with
laryngectomies (and some kids too) do.

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Richard J Kinch
2005-09-27 16:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
I wonder if helium will dissolve in water.
No, too small a Henry's Law constant. CO2 is remarkably soluble in water
and remarkably temperature-dependent in its solubility. It wouldn't be
fizzy otherwise.
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-27 22:32:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard J Kinch
Post by Don Foreman
I wonder if helium will dissolve in water.
No, too small a Henry's Law constant. CO2 is remarkably soluble in water
and remarkably temperature-dependent in its solubility. It wouldn't be
fizzy otherwise.
Does that have also something to do with why deep sea divers use a
helium oxygen mix instead of nitrogen oxygen (air), because maybe the
helium doesn't give them "the bends" as easily as nitrogen?

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Charles Spitzer
2005-09-27 22:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard J Kinch
Post by Don Foreman
I wonder if helium will dissolve in water.
No, too small a Henry's Law constant. CO2 is remarkably soluble in water
and remarkably temperature-dependent in its solubility. It wouldn't be
fizzy otherwise.
Does that have also something to do with why deep sea divers use a helium
oxygen mix instead of nitrogen oxygen (air), because maybe the helium
doesn't give them "the bends" as easily as nitrogen?
Jeff
yes.

nitrogen dissolves in blood under pressure. it comes out as bubbles when the
pressure lets off, causing the bends.

helium doesn't.

regards,
charlie
http://glassartists.org/chaniarts
Richard J Kinch
2005-09-27 23:58:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Does that have also something to do with why deep sea divers use a
helium oxygen mix instead of nitrogen oxygen (air), because maybe the
helium doesn't give them "the bends" as easily as nitrogen?
Helium is inert, nitrogen is narcotic at depth.

Helium is much less viscous; much less effort to respire vs other gases.

Instead of helium, sport divers poison themselves with excess oxygen to
reduce the pN2 in the mix, aka "nitrox". Sport divers can't be trusted
with helium mixes. This is considered cool and advanced.
Don Foreman
2005-09-28 04:14:54 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 18:58:18 -0500, Richard J Kinch
Post by Richard J Kinch
Post by Jeff Wisnia
Does that have also something to do with why deep sea divers use a
helium oxygen mix instead of nitrogen oxygen (air), because maybe the
helium doesn't give them "the bends" as easily as nitrogen?
Helium is inert, nitrogen is narcotic at depth.
Helium is much less viscous; much less effort to respire vs other gases.
Instead of helium, sport divers poison themselves with excess oxygen to
reduce the pN2 in the mix, aka "nitrox". Sport divers can't be trusted
with helium mixes. This is considered cool and advanced.
Sport divers are categorically dumber than ... whom? Jeff, a
graduate of MIT, was a sport diver. My son, a grad of U of MN in EE,
is a sport diver. I doubt that many professional deep divers have
PhD's.
Richard J Kinch
2005-09-28 05:23:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
Sport divers are categorically dumber than ... whom?
Sorry, my sarcasm should have been clearer. I am a sport diver myself.
Dive shops have to assume their clientele are idiots. I know from
experience that one breath of seawater will lower your effective IQ quite a
bit.
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-28 16:24:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
Sport divers are categorically dumber than ... whom? Jeff, a
graduate of MIT, was a sport diver. My son, a grad of U of MN in EE,
is a sport diver. I doubt that many professional deep divers have
PhD's.
Hey, wachitt Don! I represent that remark!

(Or s**t, I meant to say resent.)

That old "rapture of the deep" just keeps coming back I guess, though
it's been at least 40 years since I last pulled on a wet suit.

Me and my diving buddy circa the early 60s:

http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/temp/divepals.html

Metal content...lead diving weights and the metal CO2 cartridge holders
over her right boob and my left.

We made our own wet suits back then (Trace, snip and glue.), and I came
up with the bright idea of installing the rubber bladders from a couple
of "Mae West" life vests inside our wet suit jackets, with the CO2 and
oral inflators outside, to use if we needed emergency flotation.

Before some wisenheimer asks, the offset locations of those CO2
cartridge holders on our two suits didn't didn't cause us any underwater
entanglements. I'm righthanded and she was sinistral*, so I picked those
locations for activtion by our dominant hands.

She got some strange looks from people by standing on the beach and
popping the CO2, long before Dolly Parton became a household word.

Jeff

* http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=sinistral
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
d***@krl.org
2005-09-27 05:39:05 UTC
Permalink
CO2 works pretty well for Mig welding steel, but it is not good for
aluminum.

Dan
Post by Grant Erwin
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
GWE
Ignoramus4243
2005-09-27 12:40:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.


i
Seismo Malm
2005-09-27 13:05:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
i
I have used carbonator cap (I now have two systems, one at work and one at
home) to carbonate water. see http://www.liquidbread.com/carb.html
Morebeer (www.morebeer.com) sells it for 12 USD but you will need co2
tank, ball lock connector and regulator. You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too (either in bottles or corny kegs).
--
seismo malm | sfnet 20 vuotta -bileet http://liw.iki.fi/liw/cgi/20v.cgi
Ignoramus4243
2005-09-27 13:33:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
i
I have used carbonator cap (I now have two systems, one at work and one at
home) to carbonate water. see http://www.liquidbread.com/carb.html
Morebeer (www.morebeer.com) sells it for 12 USD but you will need co2
tank, ball lock connector and regulator. You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too (either in bottles or corny kegs).
That's very interesting. With this, I also need a CO2 tank and a
regulator, right?

i
Seismo Malm
2005-09-27 14:16:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
i
I have used carbonator cap (I now have two systems, one at work and one at
home) to carbonate water. see http://www.liquidbread.com/carb.html
Morebeer (www.morebeer.com) sells it for 12 USD but you will need co2
tank, ball lock connector and regulator. You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too (either in bottles or corny kegs).
That's very interesting. With this, I also need a CO2 tank and a
regulator, right?
i
Yep.

Locally I pay 0.40 euro per litre for naturally carbonated mineral water
(cheapest brand) and local homebrew store sold me 750 gram co2
bottle+regulator for 50 euros (refill at 15 euros [expensive]). One litre
of co2 weights about 2 grams so I will get about 100 litres of carbonated
water (4 volumes of carbon dioxide per volume of water) with one refill
and no empty bottles to dispose of. With larger co2 tank savings are
biger, locally it is about same if you fill a 10 kg tank or 750 gram one.

At home I have 10 kg tank, it takes several years for me to use it.

Btw, I live in Finland (where usual price of brand soft drinks [Coca-Cola,
Pepsi, Sprite ...] is something like 2.20 euros per 1.5 litres [1.7 USD /
quart ...])
--
seismo malm | sfnet 20 vuotta -bileet http://liw.iki.fi/liw/cgi/20v.cgi
Ignoramus4243
2005-09-27 14:38:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
i
I have used carbonator cap (I now have two systems, one at work and one at
home) to carbonate water. see http://www.liquidbread.com/carb.html
Morebeer (www.morebeer.com) sells it for 12 USD but you will need co2
tank, ball lock connector and regulator. You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too (either in bottles or corny kegs).
That's very interesting. With this, I also need a CO2 tank and a
regulator, right?
i
Yep.
Locally I pay 0.40 euro per litre for naturally carbonated mineral water
(cheapest brand) and local homebrew store sold me 750 gram co2
bottle+regulator for 50 euros (refill at 15 euros [expensive]). One litre
of co2 weights about 2 grams so I will get about 100 litres of carbonated
water (4 volumes of carbon dioxide per volume of water) with one refill
and no empty bottles to dispose of. With larger co2 tank savings are
biger, locally it is about same if you fill a 10 kg tank or 750 gram one.
At home I have 10 kg tank, it takes several years for me to use it.
Btw, I live in Finland (where usual price of brand soft drinks [Coca-Cola,
Pepsi, Sprite ...] is something like 2.20 euros per 1.5 litres [1.7 USD /
quart ...])
Very nice. I would be looking into getting a CO2 tank and regulator. I
am sick of buying carbonated water. It costs me approximately 50 US
cents per liter, same as your 0.40 euros. Maybe I will look into
buying a use soda fountain, if it is possible to use one without
syrup.

i
--
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-28 16:32:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Seismo Malm
Post by Ignoramus4243
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Jeff Wisnia
I would have expected no less than that from you, Don, the guy who IIRC
told me he made a his own special bottle cap so he could refizz flat
soda pop with CO2.
I just pour the flat soda in my 40 year old "soda syphon" and waste a
CO2 cartridge on it, 'cause I don't have a big tank of CO2 standing
around. :-)
Jeff Wisnia
I have nailed the problem of either making soda water or recarbonating anything
fizzy in a plastic soda bottle. I followed Richard Kinch's advice pretty much
but for the cap hardware. I just went to the car parts store and bought some
screw-on Schrader valves and drilled holes in plastic bottlecaps and screwed on
the Schrader valves. I have a CO2 tank with Schrader fitting so now it's duck
soup to pressurize a plastic bottle. For awhile I had my kids make their own
pop. I think they were horrified by the quantities of sugar that went in,
because now they don't drink sugary pop any more, so I'd say it worked.
I'm wondering if a small CO2 bottle, the 20 pound kind, can be used for MIG
welding aluminum.
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
i
I have used carbonator cap (I now have two systems, one at work and one at
home) to carbonate water. see http://www.liquidbread.com/carb.html
Morebeer (www.morebeer.com) sells it for 12 USD but you will need co2
tank, ball lock connector and regulator. You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too (either in bottles or corny kegs).
That's very interesting. With this, I also need a CO2 tank and a
regulator, right?
i
Yep.
Locally I pay 0.40 euro per litre for naturally carbonated mineral water
(cheapest brand) and local homebrew store sold me 750 gram co2
bottle+regulator for 50 euros (refill at 15 euros [expensive]). One litre
of co2 weights about 2 grams so I will get about 100 litres of carbonated
water (4 volumes of carbon dioxide per volume of water) with one refill
and no empty bottles to dispose of. With larger co2 tank savings are
biger, locally it is about same if you fill a 10 kg tank or 750 gram one.
At home I have 10 kg tank, it takes several years for me to use it.
Btw, I live in Finland (where usual price of brand soft drinks [Coca-Cola,
Pepsi, Sprite ...] is something like 2.20 euros per 1.5 litres [1.7 USD /
quart ...])
Very nice. I would be looking into getting a CO2 tank and regulator. I
am sick of buying carbonated water. It costs me approximately 50 US
cents per liter, same as your 0.40 euros. Maybe I will look into
buying a use soda fountain, if it is possible to use one without
syrup.
i
Seems appropriate to add this here for any of you not yet familiar with it:

http://home.howstuffworks.com/question446.htm

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
j***@boltblue.com
2005-09-27 19:04:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Seismo Malm
You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too
AARRggghh! & you can use Moore & Wright micrometers to do up nuts, slip
guages make excellent packing for small pieces held in vice jaws, whilst
your lathe bed makes an excellent anvil, unless you've marked it too much
by angle grinding floor tiles on it.

-----------------------------------------------------------
***@boltblue.com
-----------------------------------------------------------
gfulton
2005-09-28 02:31:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@boltblue.com
Post by Seismo Malm
You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too
AARRggghh! & you can use Moore & Wright micrometers to do up nuts, slip
guages make excellent packing for small pieces held in vice jaws, whilst
your lathe bed makes an excellent anvil, unless you've marked it too much
by angle grinding floor tiles on it.
-----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------
It's not as bad as it sounds. There was a store, (Boots if I remember it
right), in England that sold a home brewing kit that included a thick walled
plastic brewing container that held about 5 gallons. Once you added the
wort and yeast and let if ferment, it built up it's own CO2 feed pressure
and carbonation. After a few weeks, when you started pulling off the beer
and it got down to about half the level of the sealed container, the
pressure was no longer sufficient to push it out through the tap. There was
a one way valve on the top where you could inject CO2 from a tool that held
a small gas cartridge. I brewed a lot of beer in one of these things
overseas and they worked well. Couldn't tell any difference in the taste
after I started using the gas injector when the level dropped.
Gerald Miller
2005-09-28 04:44:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by gfulton
It's not as bad as it sounds. There was a store, (Boots if I remember it
right), in England that sold a home brewing kit that included a thick walled
plastic brewing container that held about 5 gallons. Once you added the
wort and yeast and let if ferment, it built up it's own CO2 feed pressure
and carbonation. After a few weeks, when you started pulling off the beer
and it got down to about half the level of the sealed container, the
pressure was no longer sufficient to push it out through the tap. There was
a one way valve on the top where you could inject CO2 from a tool that held
a small gas cartridge. I brewed a lot of beer in one of these things
overseas and they worked well. Couldn't tell any difference in the taste
after I started using the gas injector when the level dropped.
May have been sold by Boots but was made by Edme - I have one down
in the "brewery" that I used a few times, even modified the shelving
(metal content) in the beer fridge to accommodate the unit. but was
never satisfied. The beer was made in a separate vessel then racked
into the pressure barrel and a bit more sugar added for carbonation.
If anyone wants to try it, it is free to a good home including 8 or 10
of the CO2 cartridges and instructions.
Gerry :-)}
London, Canada
Don Foreman
2005-09-28 04:18:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@boltblue.com
Post by Seismo Malm
You can use it to carbonate beer
or hard cider too
AARRggghh! & you can use Moore & Wright micrometers to do up nuts, slip
guages make excellent packing for small pieces held in vice jaws, whilst
your lathe bed makes an excellent anvil, unless you've marked it too much
by angle grinding floor tiles on it.
LOL. Geez, I never tried the lathe bed for grinding floor tiles.
I've always use the granite surface plate -- but the working height
of the lathe bed might indeed be easier on my back. Thanks!
Grant Erwin
2005-09-27 15:06:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ignoramus4243
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
Richard Kinch did a real good writeup: http://truetex.com/carbonation.htm
I used his method for joining the valve to the cap, but I used a Schrader valve
on my hose and just pressurize the thing like you're blowing up a car tire.

Fill the bottle 1/3 full of water, put it on its side in the freezer, then rap
it smartly against the edge of a table to break the ice into chunks, then fill
with cold water (leaving some head space) and then pressurize while shaking. It
really works great.

GWE
Ignoramus26153
2005-09-28 13:45:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Ignoramus4243
Grant, I am greatly interested in making my own carbonated water. I am
on low carb, no sugar, but we spend quite a bit of $$ on buying
carbonated mineral water. Can you give some more details on homemade
carbonated water, thanks.
Richard Kinch did a real good writeup: http://truetex.com/carbonation.htm
I used his method for joining the valve to the cap, but I used a Schrader valve
on my hose and just pressurize the thing like you're blowing up a car tire.
Fill the bottle 1/3 full of water, put it on its side in the freezer, then rap
it smartly against the edge of a table to break the ice into chunks, then fill
with cold water (leaving some head space) and then pressurize while shaking. It
really works great.
Very nice. I am reading the webpage now. I would love to make some
carbonater.

i
Leo Lichtman
2005-09-27 02:22:16 UTC
Permalink
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
Don Foreman
2005-09-27 07:17:21 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 02:22:16 GMT, "Leo Lichtman"
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
Feel free to market it if you like. I'm retired! If you get
rich, send me a case of Dixie VooDoo black lager if you think of it.
Rex B
2005-09-27 15:30:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
That's pretty unlikely, due to product liability concerns.

Is propane better than compressed air, due to the pressure and dryness?
What's the pressure of a propane tank?
Will a 20-lb BBQ grill propane tank also be suitable?
Grant Erwin
2005-09-27 15:44:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rex B
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one
end to screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an
order right now.
That's pretty unlikely, due to product liability concerns.
Is propane better than compressed air, due to the pressure and dryness?
What's the pressure of a propane tank?
Will a 20-lb BBQ grill propane tank also be suitable?
The propellant in many spray cans *is* propane.

GWE
Rex B
2005-09-27 16:10:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Post by Rex B
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one
end to screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an
order right now.
That's pretty unlikely, due to product liability concerns.
Is propane better than compressed air, due to the pressure and dryness?
What's the pressure of a propane tank?
Will a 20-lb BBQ grill propane tank also be suitable?
The propellant in many spray cans *is* propane.
I thought they had pretty much all gone to compressed air, due to
environmental concerns, plus safety.
I didn't know that a spray can could work as a flame thrower, until
my BIL showed me in the hair spray dept at Treasure City 35 years ago ;)
Don Foreman
2005-09-27 16:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rex B
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
That's pretty unlikely, due to product liability concerns.
Is propane better than compressed air, due to the pressure and dryness?
What's the pressure of a propane tank?
Will a 20-lb BBQ grill propane tank also be suitable?
Propane is better because vapor pressure in the can is constant as
long as there is any liquid propane present.

Propane pressure varies with temperature, is 110 PSI at 70F
See http://www.flameengineering.com/Propane_Info.html

A 14 oz propane bottle is better, because you can easily tip it upside
down to shoot liquid rather than gas into the paint can. It will
only shoot until the pressures equalize, but that's usually enough to
revive the can.
Roger Shoaf
2005-09-27 16:19:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
I wonder if you purchased a butane cigarette lighter refill canister if one
of the 8 adaptors they supply with it would work with nothing to make?

Even if it doesn't, it would justify buying one of those neat little butane
mini torches that use the same canister.
--
Roger Shoaf

If knowledge is power, and power corrupts, what does this say about the
Congress?
Jeff Wisnia
2005-09-27 20:48:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roger Shoaf
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
I wonder if you purchased a butane cigarette lighter refill canister if one
of the 8 adaptors they supply with it would work with nothing to make?
Even if it doesn't, it would justify buying one of those neat little butane
mini torches that use the same canister.
I got sseveral of the butane "grille" cannisters (about the size of
larger spray paint cans.) on sale the end of last summer and turned a
plastic adaptor to fill my $7 HF mini torch. That's probably going to be
a lifetime supply for me. That little torch lives on my bench as a handy
and clean heat source for small stuff, including heat shrink tubing
(With a deft enough quick pass, that is. <G>)

Interestingly, I saw the same little torch on sale at a fancy kitchen
shop for about $35 a little while ago. They were selling it for browning
the peaks of that stuff chefs top off creme bruleighs
with.(Howeverthehell they're spelled.)

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
Emmo
2005-09-27 20:56:18 UTC
Permalink
the top of a crème brulee is sugar
Post by Roger Shoaf
Post by Leo Lichtman
"Don Foreman" wrote: I made a little brass stem , threaded on one end to
screw into the pipe of a Bernz-O-Matic propane torch. (clip)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
That's a marketable idea. If they were for sale, I would place an order
right now.
I wonder if you purchased a butane cigarette lighter refill canister if one
of the 8 adaptors they supply with it would work with nothing to make?
Even if it doesn't, it would justify buying one of those neat little butane
mini torches that use the same canister.
I got sseveral of the butane "grille" cannisters (about the size of larger
spray paint cans.) on sale the end of last summer and turned a plastic
adaptor to fill my $7 HF mini torch. That's probably going to be a
lifetime supply for me. That little torch lives on my bench as a handy and
clean heat source for small stuff, including heat shrink tubing (With a
deft enough quick pass, that is. <G>)
Interestingly, I saw the same little torch on sale at a fancy kitchen shop
for about $35 a little while ago. They were selling it for browning the
peaks of that stuff chefs top off creme bruleighs with.(Howeverthehell
they're spelled.)
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"Truth exists; only falsehood has to be invented."
d***@krl.org
2005-09-27 05:34:14 UTC
Permalink
Thanks. I will remember this.

Dan
Andy Asberry
2005-09-26 23:52:53 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Put it in the freezer overnight. There will be hardly any pressure.
Dave
2005-09-27 02:49:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
I've done this many times. Go outside with a smallish bucket and pierce
the side near the top or bottom with a knife tip. Twist a bit, and push.
A small hole; about 1/16 x 1/16 inch. It'll hiss, pull knife out, it'll
hiss like hell, then tilt so the pressure pushes the paint out into your
bucket.

It's not going to burst like a balloon. But you will get paint on
yourself.

~Dave
Gunner
2005-09-27 11:05:12 UTC
Permalink
Horrible Freight used to, and may still sell a refillable spray paint
can. Had a Schrader valve you could pressure up with your air hose. I
wound up with several of them over the years, and they work quite well
if you do have to bust open a spray can. They came with a handful of
nozzles, most of which Ive lost by now.

Gunner

"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire.
Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us)
off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give
them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you
for torturing the cat." Gunner
Larry Jaques
2005-09-27 20:29:41 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Sep 2005 11:05:12 GMT, with neither quill nor qualm, Gunner
Post by Gunner
Horrible Freight used to, and may still sell a refillable spray paint
can. Had a Schrader valve you could pressure up with your air hose. I
wound up with several of them over the years, and they work quite well
if you do have to bust open a spray can. They came with a handful of
nozzles, most of which Ive lost by now.
HF still makes 'em. I saw one a couple months back and I own one.
They work OK for thin stuff but won't work for spraying latex paint.
DAMHIKT. $9.95 on sale.
--
"Simplicity of life, even the barest, is not misery but
the very foundation of refinement." --William Morris
-----------------------------------
www.diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
KyMike
2005-09-27 23:43:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gunner
Horrible Freight used to, and may still sell a refillable spray paint
can. Had a Schrader valve you could pressure up with your air hose. I
wound up with several of them over the years, and they work quite well
if you do have to bust open a spray can. They came with a handful of
nozzles, most of which Ive lost by now.
Gunner
I tried one of these and it did work well for a while, then the nozzle
clogged and resisted every attempt at un-clogging. Naturally the stem
is an oddball diameter (probably metric) and an ordinary can nozzle
won't fit.

Mike
Gunner
2005-09-27 10:59:38 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Put on another nozzle from another paint can? Thats what I normally
do when this happens

Gunner

"Pax Americana is a philosophy. Hardly an empire.
Making sure other people play nice and dont kill each other (and us)
off in job lots is hardly empire building, particularly when you give
them self determination under "play nice" rules.

Think of it as having your older brother knock the shit out of you
for torturing the cat." Gunner
wmbjk
2005-09-27 21:29:49 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
How about adapting one of those little refrigerant-can hoses to
puncture the bottom. They already have a rubber seal and a screw-down
needle, so you'd only need to invent a bomb-bottom-gripper. ;-)

Wayne
Rex B
2005-09-27 22:26:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Foreman
On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
How about adapting one of those little refrigerant-can hoses to
puncture the bottom. They already have a rubber seal and a screw-down
needle, so you'd only need to invent a bomb-bottom-gripper. ;-)
Use the kind that wraps around the OD, shim it as needed. Punctures the
side.
Roger
2005-10-30 02:23:47 UTC
Permalink
I had a can of WD that had fallen on its tip. It was so screwed up
that it wouldn't even spit. I tipped it over with the bottom up at an
angle and stuck it with a scribe. (I was outside when I did this).
As the scribe pierced the can, it did spray a bit but only a little.
After a short time, the pressure bled off and the can was inert. I
drained the WD out into a bowl and everybody lived happily ever
after....

On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
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~Roy
2005-10-30 14:32:57 UTC
Permalink
I have poke lots of spray cans over the yeras and have never had much
sucess in usuing the paint inside with a brush. It would either dry to
darn quick to brush out, or it would be too thin. One thing that was
most always present was the paints seemed to be super saturated with
whatever was used for propellent, and even when all pressure was out
of spray can, and pain t was place in a small container like a jar
etc, it was always sort of in a constant motion and moving with micro
bubbles gassing out, even days later. My plans to use it in an airbush
never worked either.
===<>I had a can of WD that had fallen on its tip. It was so screwed up
===<>that it wouldn't even spit. I tipped it over with the bottom up at an
===<>angle and stuck it with a scribe. (I was outside when I did this).
===<>As the scribe pierced the can, it did spray a bit but only a little.
===<>After a short time, the pressure bled off and the can was inert. I
===<>drained the WD out into a bowl and everybody lived happily ever
===<>after....
===<>
===<>On Mon, 26 Sep 2005 11:23:43 -0700, Grant Erwin
===<>
===<>>Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
===<>>completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
===<>>
===<>>How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
===<>>tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
===<>>the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
===<>>the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
===<>>
===<>>Ideas? Experience?
===<>>
===<>>GWE
===<>
===<>
===<>
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==============================================
Put some color in your cheeks...garden naked!
"The original frugal ponder"
~~~~ }<((((o> ~~~~~~ }<{{{{o> ~~~~~~~ }<(((((o>
Tom Wait
2005-10-31 03:02:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by ~Roy
I have poke lots of spray cans over the yeras and have never had much
sucess in usuing the paint inside
Snip
My plans to use it in an airbush
Post by ~Roy
never worked either.
I just had this problem . I drilled a small hole in the top of the can and
let the gas out paint started coming out along with the gas and I held a rag
over the can until the hissing stopped. Then tipped the can up and the gas
mixed in with the paint squirted the paint into the cup of my touch up gun.
I painted my composite gun stock with the spray gun and it came out
perfectly. I could have waited and ordered a new tip from Brownell's for $4
plus shipping and waited three days. I chose to sacrifice an ounce of paint
and get the job done. I saved the leftover paint in an airtight can and
will use it again.
Don Stauffer
2005-10-30 16:37:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
Is it the plastic nozzle that is clogged, or the valve in the can? If it
is just the nozzle, you can replace it with a similar nozzle.

One tip to prevent clogging, always replace the can cover as soon as
possible after cleaning the nozzle.
B.B.
2005-10-31 00:22:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
How about a freon can tap? You know, the clamp-on type with a barbed
needle to pierce the side of the can. Usually come with a shim or two
for various sizes of cans. I think it can get small enough to grab a
spray paint can. Do it up high to vent the pressure instead of the
paint.
And yes, this article just appeared on my news spool today. Weird.
--
B.B. --I am not a goat! thegoat4 at airmail dot net
Tim Killian
2005-10-31 00:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by B.B.
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
How about a freon can tap? You know, the clamp-on type with a barbed
needle to pierce the side of the can. Usually come with a shim or two
for various sizes of cans. I think it can get small enough to grab a
spray paint can. Do it up high to vent the pressure instead of the
paint.
And yes, this article just appeared on my news spool today. Weird.
How about this - throw the plugged can in the trash and buy a new one?
I've seen two people try to do what you're suggesting, and both times
they ended up with a big mess.
B.B.
2005-10-31 00:59:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim Killian
Post by B.B.
How about a freon can tap? You know, the clamp-on type with a barbed
needle to pierce the side of the can. Usually come with a shim or two
for various sizes of cans. I think it can get small enough to grab a
spray paint can. Do it up high to vent the pressure instead of the
paint.
And yes, this article just appeared on my news spool today. Weird.
How about this - throw the plugged can in the trash and buy a new one?
I've seen two people try to do what you're suggesting, and both times
they ended up with a big mess.
What happened? They poke the seam and rip the can open?
--
B.B. --I am not a goat! thegoat4 at airmail dot net
Tim Killian
2005-10-31 03:41:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by B.B.
Post by Tim Killian
Post by B.B.
How about a freon can tap? You know, the clamp-on type with a barbed
needle to pierce the side of the can. Usually come with a shim or two
for various sizes of cans. I think it can get small enough to grab a
spray paint can. Do it up high to vent the pressure instead of the
paint.
And yes, this article just appeared on my news spool today. Weird.
How about this - throw the plugged can in the trash and buy a new one?
I've seen two people try to do what you're suggesting, and both times
they ended up with a big mess.
What happened? They poke the seam and rip the can open?
The first was my older brother who used a nail to puncture a small,
plugged-up can of Testors spray paint so he could finish a model he was
building. The can got away from him and rolled across his bedroom floor
spewing red paint. My mother wasn't amused. The second was a machinist
friend who used a dental probe to try and unclog the stem on a can of
white spray paint. It suddenly spewed in his face -- he is a black guy
-- and everyone in his shop must have laughed for ten minutes at the
result. Imagine black-face makeup in reverse!

I suppose you could put the can inside a big trash bag, go outdoors, and
puncture it to try and save the paint. I wouldn't bother with it. If the
cops see you, they'll arrest you for huffing ;-)
jk
2005-10-31 06:43:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by B.B.
Post by Tim Killian
How about this - throw the plugged can in the trash and buy a new one?
I've seen two people try to do what you're suggesting, and both times
they ended up with a big mess.
What happened? They poke the seam and rip the can open?
I had something like that happened with a can of gold spray paint
once. It was on the floor ,behind something else. Not knowing it was
there, I knocked someti=thing bag and sharp off of a bench, and was
amazed when every thing in my line of sight near the floor magically
turned to gold in an instant. THought there was something seriously
wrong with my eyes for a moment.


jk
Martin H. Eastburn
2005-11-07 02:29:55 UTC
Permalink
Good idea - upside down from the all metal end. Have the can resting up-side-down
for a good while to help drain stuff and keep the Freon system clean.

I might just do that myself - needing it also.

Martin
Martin Eastburn
@ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net
NRA LOH, NRA Life
NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Post by B.B.
Post by Grant Erwin
Is there any safe way to open a still-pressurized can of spray paint with a
completely plugged nozzle, to get the paint out so I can brush it on?
How about if I made a tool e.g. drilled a small hole in a Popsicle stick or
tongue depressor, turned the can upside down, removed the nozzle, and depressed
the valve stem with the hole aligned? Maybe the air would all come out and leave
the paint inside, then I could cut it open any way I wanted reasonably safely.
Ideas? Experience?
GWE
How about a freon can tap? You know, the clamp-on type with a barbed
needle to pierce the side of the can. Usually come with a shim or two
for various sizes of cans. I think it can get small enough to grab a
spray paint can. Do it up high to vent the pressure instead of the
paint.
And yes, this article just appeared on my news spool today. Weird.
----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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